joereorda:

vectorgallery ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ #jjbrine ⭐️⬅️

Source: vectorgallery

I looked you up on facebook, and you are friends with some of my friends. However, I'm not sure if you know them personally or not. Just thought that was a funny coincidence
Anonymous

Butcher Christ for my entertainment, please.

kouriel:

jadedcheez:

electronify:

vectorgallery:

Donate your organs to art tonight.Vector Gallery is now accepting organ donations from patrons of the arts.We want to install your organs in a future installation!We will decorate our walls with your insides.
WE WILL DECORATE OUR WALLS WITH YOUR INSIDES
VECTOR GALLERY INVITES 
Patrons of the arts
To donate their organs
To art tonight
contact us
VECTORGALLERYNYC@GMAIL.COM 
213-509-4101
Send Anonymously
VECTOR Gallery
40 CLINTON STREET 
NYC, NY 10002
“ON RIVERS OF BLOOD WE CAME RIDING IN”

is this real life

id rather donate my organs to people who need it to live
no offense but people’s lives are more important than art

yeah i have to agree with that comment because holy shit there is already such a huge need for donated organs. Of course people can do with their body what they wish, but if you’re thinking of giving your dead body away I strongly suggest you consider donating it for medical uses, because there are many people who actually die on the waitlist for organ transplants.
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kouriel:

jadedcheez:

electronify:

vectorgallery:

Donate your organs to art tonight.Vector Gallery is now accepting organ donations from patrons of the arts.We want to install your organs in a future installation!We will decorate our walls with your insides.
WE WILL DECORATE OUR WALLS WITH YOUR INSIDES
VECTOR GALLERY INVITES 
Patrons of the arts
To donate their organs
To art tonight
contact us
VECTORGALLERYNYC@GMAIL.COM 
213-509-4101
Send Anonymously
VECTOR Gallery
40 CLINTON STREET 
NYC, NY 10002
“ON RIVERS OF BLOOD WE CAME RIDING IN”

is this real life

id rather donate my organs to people who need it to live
no offense but people’s lives are more important than art

yeah i have to agree with that comment because holy shit there is already such a huge need for donated organs. Of course people can do with their body what they wish, but if you’re thinking of giving your dead body away I strongly suggest you consider donating it for medical uses, because there are many people who actually die on the waitlist for organ transplants.
ZoomInfo
kouriel:

jadedcheez:

electronify:

vectorgallery:

Donate your organs to art tonight.Vector Gallery is now accepting organ donations from patrons of the arts.We want to install your organs in a future installation!We will decorate our walls with your insides.
WE WILL DECORATE OUR WALLS WITH YOUR INSIDES
VECTOR GALLERY INVITES 
Patrons of the arts
To donate their organs
To art tonight
contact us
VECTORGALLERYNYC@GMAIL.COM 
213-509-4101
Send Anonymously
VECTOR Gallery
40 CLINTON STREET 
NYC, NY 10002
“ON RIVERS OF BLOOD WE CAME RIDING IN”

is this real life

id rather donate my organs to people who need it to live
no offense but people’s lives are more important than art

yeah i have to agree with that comment because holy shit there is already such a huge need for donated organs. Of course people can do with their body what they wish, but if you’re thinking of giving your dead body away I strongly suggest you consider donating it for medical uses, because there are many people who actually die on the waitlist for organ transplants.
ZoomInfo

kouriel:

jadedcheez:

electronify:

vectorgallery:

Donate your organs to art tonight.
Vector Gallery is now accepting organ donations from patrons of the arts.

We want to install your organs in a future installation!
We will decorate our walls with your insides.

WE WILL DECORATE OUR WALLS WITH YOUR INSIDES

VECTOR GALLERY INVITES 

Patrons of the arts

To donate their organs

To art tonight

contact us

VECTORGALLERYNYC@GMAIL.COM 

213-509-4101

Send Anonymously

VECTOR Gallery

40 CLINTON STREET 

NYC, NY 10002

“ON RIVERS OF BLOOD WE CAME RIDING IN”

is this real life

id rather donate my organs to people who need it to live

no offense but people’s lives are more important than art

yeah i have to agree with that comment because holy shit there is already such a huge need for donated organs. Of course people can do with their body what they wish, but if you’re thinking of giving your dead body away I strongly suggest you consider donating it for medical uses, because there are many people who actually die on the waitlist for organ transplants.

Source: vectorgallery

jjbrine:

VECTOR GALLERY 2017 + 2018 + 2019
Time flies, but it doesn’t move. ALL NUMBERS ARE IMAGINARY!
∞ < |Ø| “because” infinity is “below” the absolute value of the empty set 
|Ø| > ∞ "because" the absolute value of the empty set is "above" infinity
ZoomInfo
jjbrine:

VECTOR GALLERY 2017 + 2018 + 2019
Time flies, but it doesn’t move. ALL NUMBERS ARE IMAGINARY!
∞ < |Ø| “because” infinity is “below” the absolute value of the empty set 
|Ø| > ∞ "because" the absolute value of the empty set is "above" infinity
ZoomInfo
jjbrine:

VECTOR GALLERY 2017 + 2018 + 2019
Time flies, but it doesn’t move. ALL NUMBERS ARE IMAGINARY!
∞ < |Ø| “because” infinity is “below” the absolute value of the empty set 
|Ø| > ∞ "because" the absolute value of the empty set is "above" infinity
ZoomInfo

jjbrine:

VECTOR GALLERY 2017 + 2018 + 2019

Time flies, but it doesn’t move. ALL NUMBERS ARE IMAGINARY!

∞ < |Ø| “because” infinity is “below” the absolute value of the empty set 

|Ø| > ∞ "because" the absolute value of the empty set is "above" infinity

(via vectorgallery)

Source: jjbrine

jjbrine:

"Oh but Eye never Thee sanction twice, be ye ever as naughty as thou art nice! Eye am the Intelligence that animates All Life."

(via vectorgallery)

Source: jjbrine

vectorgallery:

THE PRINCE OF THE POST HUMAN MOVEMENT JJ BRINE


BY ROBBIE LEE




Mishka family I would like you all to meet  the multimedia installation artist and electronic musician out of the NYC area, JJ Brine. He is pushing the doorways open with his dose of post human art.  In July 2013 JJ opened up an art space VECTOR on the lower east side of NYC and soon afterwards, The Vector Gallery was quickly described as the best new art gallery by Art-awards.com and also called the new Andy’ Warhol’s Factory by The Huffington Post. JJ’s artwork, style, direction and all around creativity is showcased heavy at gallery and as a musician Brine uses his originality and vision to shine bright.  He has described his solo musical projects as ESM (electronic sprit music). JJ also plays part to The LaBiancas, a Charles Manson concept duo band.  In the long run JJ is a artist on the forefront of a new movement,  so recently I to caught up with the artist for a few words, I was honored - and here’s what we discussed:
Robbie: Hello and how are you today?JJ: The feeling is indescribable.
Robbie: Ok, in your own words what should a first time vector gallery visitor expect?JJ: Illumination.
Robbie: What would you say has been your favorite event (or art) showcased at the vector gallery and why?JJ: Independence Night.  It was like the Red Sea, parting
Robbie: Can you tell us your main goal when you opened the doors at vector gallery? And what inspired you?JJ: The goal was the act itself, and I was inspired by doing it.
Robbie: You’ve described vector as having its own time zone. Can you feel us in a little more on that?JJ:  Yes. It’s easier for me to bend 2014 to my will if I’m working in 2019.
Robbie: How did you come up with the concept of ESM for your solo projects and how did the Charles Manson concept band come together? - Are there any musical projects for you in the works?JJ: It came from a sense of being possessed and using vocal transformers to give voice to the spirits that wanted to sing through me. There are so many spirits, and surely there is more for them to sing about.
Robbie: What should we look forward to seeing coming out of the vector gallery?JJ: A big change is coming soon.  But for now that information remains classified, so you’ll have to wait and see.




CATEGORY: 

LIFESTYLE, STYLE, MUSIC





TAGS: 

VECTOR GALLERY, NYC, LABIANCAS, 2019
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vectorgallery:

THE PRINCE OF THE POST HUMAN MOVEMENT JJ BRINE


BY ROBBIE LEE




Mishka family I would like you all to meet  the multimedia installation artist and electronic musician out of the NYC area, JJ Brine. He is pushing the doorways open with his dose of post human art.  In July 2013 JJ opened up an art space VECTOR on the lower east side of NYC and soon afterwards, The Vector Gallery was quickly described as the best new art gallery by Art-awards.com and also called the new Andy’ Warhol’s Factory by The Huffington Post. JJ’s artwork, style, direction and all around creativity is showcased heavy at gallery and as a musician Brine uses his originality and vision to shine bright.  He has described his solo musical projects as ESM (electronic sprit music). JJ also plays part to The LaBiancas, a Charles Manson concept duo band.  In the long run JJ is a artist on the forefront of a new movement,  so recently I to caught up with the artist for a few words, I was honored - and here’s what we discussed:
Robbie: Hello and how are you today?JJ: The feeling is indescribable.
Robbie: Ok, in your own words what should a first time vector gallery visitor expect?JJ: Illumination.
Robbie: What would you say has been your favorite event (or art) showcased at the vector gallery and why?JJ: Independence Night.  It was like the Red Sea, parting
Robbie: Can you tell us your main goal when you opened the doors at vector gallery? And what inspired you?JJ: The goal was the act itself, and I was inspired by doing it.
Robbie: You’ve described vector as having its own time zone. Can you feel us in a little more on that?JJ:  Yes. It’s easier for me to bend 2014 to my will if I’m working in 2019.
Robbie: How did you come up with the concept of ESM for your solo projects and how did the Charles Manson concept band come together? - Are there any musical projects for you in the works?JJ: It came from a sense of being possessed and using vocal transformers to give voice to the spirits that wanted to sing through me. There are so many spirits, and surely there is more for them to sing about.
Robbie: What should we look forward to seeing coming out of the vector gallery?JJ: A big change is coming soon.  But for now that information remains classified, so you’ll have to wait and see.




CATEGORY: 

LIFESTYLE, STYLE, MUSIC





TAGS: 

VECTOR GALLERY, NYC, LABIANCAS, 2019
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

THE PRINCE OF THE POST HUMAN MOVEMENT JJ BRINE


BY ROBBIE LEE




Mishka family I would like you all to meet  the multimedia installation artist and electronic musician out of the NYC area, JJ Brine. He is pushing the doorways open with his dose of post human art.  In July 2013 JJ opened up an art space VECTOR on the lower east side of NYC and soon afterwards, The Vector Gallery was quickly described as the best new art gallery by Art-awards.com and also called the new Andy’ Warhol’s Factory by The Huffington Post. JJ’s artwork, style, direction and all around creativity is showcased heavy at gallery and as a musician Brine uses his originality and vision to shine bright.  He has described his solo musical projects as ESM (electronic sprit music). JJ also plays part to The LaBiancas, a Charles Manson concept duo band.  In the long run JJ is a artist on the forefront of a new movement,  so recently I to caught up with the artist for a few words, I was honored - and here’s what we discussed:
Robbie: Hello and how are you today?JJ: The feeling is indescribable.
Robbie: Ok, in your own words what should a first time vector gallery visitor expect?JJ: Illumination.
Robbie: What would you say has been your favorite event (or art) showcased at the vector gallery and why?JJ: Independence Night.  It was like the Red Sea, parting
Robbie: Can you tell us your main goal when you opened the doors at vector gallery? And what inspired you?JJ: The goal was the act itself, and I was inspired by doing it.
Robbie: You’ve described vector as having its own time zone. Can you feel us in a little more on that?JJ:  Yes. It’s easier for me to bend 2014 to my will if I’m working in 2019.
Robbie: How did you come up with the concept of ESM for your solo projects and how did the Charles Manson concept band come together? - Are there any musical projects for you in the works?JJ: It came from a sense of being possessed and using vocal transformers to give voice to the spirits that wanted to sing through me. There are so many spirits, and surely there is more for them to sing about.
Robbie: What should we look forward to seeing coming out of the vector gallery?JJ: A big change is coming soon.  But for now that information remains classified, so you’ll have to wait and see.




CATEGORY: 

LIFESTYLE, STYLE, MUSIC





TAGS: 

VECTOR GALLERY, NYC, LABIANCAS, 2019
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

THE PRINCE OF THE POST HUMAN MOVEMENT JJ BRINE


BY ROBBIE LEE




Mishka family I would like you all to meet  the multimedia installation artist and electronic musician out of the NYC area, JJ Brine. He is pushing the doorways open with his dose of post human art.  In July 2013 JJ opened up an art space VECTOR on the lower east side of NYC and soon afterwards, The Vector Gallery was quickly described as the best new art gallery by Art-awards.com and also called the new Andy’ Warhol’s Factory by The Huffington Post. JJ’s artwork, style, direction and all around creativity is showcased heavy at gallery and as a musician Brine uses his originality and vision to shine bright.  He has described his solo musical projects as ESM (electronic sprit music). JJ also plays part to The LaBiancas, a Charles Manson concept duo band.  In the long run JJ is a artist on the forefront of a new movement,  so recently I to caught up with the artist for a few words, I was honored - and here’s what we discussed:
Robbie: Hello and how are you today?JJ: The feeling is indescribable.
Robbie: Ok, in your own words what should a first time vector gallery visitor expect?JJ: Illumination.
Robbie: What would you say has been your favorite event (or art) showcased at the vector gallery and why?JJ: Independence Night.  It was like the Red Sea, parting
Robbie: Can you tell us your main goal when you opened the doors at vector gallery? And what inspired you?JJ: The goal was the act itself, and I was inspired by doing it.
Robbie: You’ve described vector as having its own time zone. Can you feel us in a little more on that?JJ:  Yes. It’s easier for me to bend 2014 to my will if I’m working in 2019.
Robbie: How did you come up with the concept of ESM for your solo projects and how did the Charles Manson concept band come together? - Are there any musical projects for you in the works?JJ: It came from a sense of being possessed and using vocal transformers to give voice to the spirits that wanted to sing through me. There are so many spirits, and surely there is more for them to sing about.
Robbie: What should we look forward to seeing coming out of the vector gallery?JJ: A big change is coming soon.  But for now that information remains classified, so you’ll have to wait and see.




CATEGORY: 

LIFESTYLE, STYLE, MUSIC





TAGS: 

VECTOR GALLERY, NYC, LABIANCAS, 2019
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

THE PRINCE OF THE POST HUMAN MOVEMENT JJ BRINE


BY ROBBIE LEE




Mishka family I would like you all to meet  the multimedia installation artist and electronic musician out of the NYC area, JJ Brine. He is pushing the doorways open with his dose of post human art.  In July 2013 JJ opened up an art space VECTOR on the lower east side of NYC and soon afterwards, The Vector Gallery was quickly described as the best new art gallery by Art-awards.com and also called the new Andy’ Warhol’s Factory by The Huffington Post. JJ’s artwork, style, direction and all around creativity is showcased heavy at gallery and as a musician Brine uses his originality and vision to shine bright.  He has described his solo musical projects as ESM (electronic sprit music). JJ also plays part to The LaBiancas, a Charles Manson concept duo band.  In the long run JJ is a artist on the forefront of a new movement,  so recently I to caught up with the artist for a few words, I was honored - and here’s what we discussed:
Robbie: Hello and how are you today?JJ: The feeling is indescribable.
Robbie: Ok, in your own words what should a first time vector gallery visitor expect?JJ: Illumination.
Robbie: What would you say has been your favorite event (or art) showcased at the vector gallery and why?JJ: Independence Night.  It was like the Red Sea, parting
Robbie: Can you tell us your main goal when you opened the doors at vector gallery? And what inspired you?JJ: The goal was the act itself, and I was inspired by doing it.
Robbie: You’ve described vector as having its own time zone. Can you feel us in a little more on that?JJ:  Yes. It’s easier for me to bend 2014 to my will if I’m working in 2019.
Robbie: How did you come up with the concept of ESM for your solo projects and how did the Charles Manson concept band come together? - Are there any musical projects for you in the works?JJ: It came from a sense of being possessed and using vocal transformers to give voice to the spirits that wanted to sing through me. There are so many spirits, and surely there is more for them to sing about.
Robbie: What should we look forward to seeing coming out of the vector gallery?JJ: A big change is coming soon.  But for now that information remains classified, so you’ll have to wait and see.




CATEGORY: 

LIFESTYLE, STYLE, MUSIC





TAGS: 

VECTOR GALLERY, NYC, LABIANCAS, 2019
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vectorgallery:

THE PRINCE OF THE POST HUMAN MOVEMENT JJ BRINE

BY ROBBIE LEE

Mishka family I would like you all to meet  the multimedia installation artist and electronic musician out of the NYC area, JJ Brine. He is pushing the doorways open with his dose of post human art.  In July 2013 JJ opened up an art space VECTOR on the lower east side of NYC and soon afterwards, The Vector Gallery was quickly described as the best new art gallery by Art-awards.com and also called the new Andy’ Warhol’s Factory by The Huffington Post. JJ’s artwork, style, direction and all around creativity is showcased heavy at gallery and as a musician Brine uses his originality and vision to shine bright.  He has described his solo musical projects as ESM (electronic sprit music). JJ also plays part to The LaBiancas, a Charles Manson concept duo band.  In the long run JJ is a artist on the forefront of a new movement,  so recently I to caught up with the artist for a few words, I was honored - and here’s what we discussed:

Robbie: Hello and how are you today?
JJ:
 The feeling is indescribable.

Robbie: Ok, in your own words what should a first time vector gallery visitor expect?
JJ: Illumination.

Robbie: What would you say has been your favorite event (or art) showcased at the vector gallery and why?
JJ: Independence Night.  It was like the Red Sea, parting

Robbie: Can you tell us your main goal when you opened the doors at vector gallery? And what inspired you?
JJ: The goal was the act itself, and I was inspired by doing it.

Robbie: You’ve described vector as having its own time zone. Can you feel us in a little more on that?
JJ Yes. It’s easier for me to bend 2014 to my will if I’m working in 2019.

Robbie: How did you come up with the concept of ESM for your solo projects and how did the Charles Manson concept band come together? - Are there any musical projects for you in the works?
JJ: It came from a sense of being possessed and using vocal transformers to give voice to the spirits that wanted to sing through me. There are so many spirits, and surely there is more for them to sing about.

Robbie: What should we look forward to seeing coming out of the vector gallery?
JJ: A big change is coming soon.  But for now that information remains classified, so you’ll have to wait and see.

CATEGORY: 

(via vectorgallery)

Source: vectorgallery

jjbrine:

Allah Buddha Manson 
 by JJ Brine
Installation at Ludlow Studios
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jjbrine:

Allah Buddha Manson 
 by JJ Brine
Installation at Ludlow Studios
ZoomInfo
jjbrine:

Allah Buddha Manson 
 by JJ Brine
Installation at Ludlow Studios
ZoomInfo
jjbrine:

Allah Buddha Manson 
 by JJ Brine
Installation at Ludlow Studios
ZoomInfo
jjbrine:

Allah Buddha Manson 
 by JJ Brine
Installation at Ludlow Studios
ZoomInfo

jjbrine:

Allah Buddha Manson

 by JJ Brine

Installation at Ludlow Studios

(via vectorgallery)

Source: jjbrine

daginja:

jjbrine if youre seeing this I love your work and youre my artistic role model/inspiration

(via vectorgallery)

Source: daginja

vectorgallery:

This Soul Phone gives Crown Prince of Hell JJ Brine access to a network of disembodied voices.  

Candidacy for embodiment is rather competitive.  As “A matchmaker for spirits seeking bodies” Brine is known for his stringent standards for admission into corporeality; the odds of receiving telephonic approval for nevent-tunnel access are approximately 1 in 236.

Source: vectorgallery

vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
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vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul
JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”“Where are you from originally?”
“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.
In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”
This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”
If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”
But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”
In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.
JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.
On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.
“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.
The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.
In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).
JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.
Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?
“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”
“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.
I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”
Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.
Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.
“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.
“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”
To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:
“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.
“Before Christ?”
“Well…”
“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”
Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#
JULY 25, 2014BY NICOLE DISSER

  
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

JJ Brine Will Let You Into His Back Room, But the Price Is Your Soul

JJ Brine, founder of the Lower East Side’s only Satanic art gallery, is not your typical interview subject. Straightforward questions simply do not work on the curator and artist-in-residence of “the Official Art Gallery of SATAN.” There were several times during our talk when Brine stared back at me — amidst imagery of Charles Manson and Baphomet the Sabbatic Goat — as if to say, “What the hell are you talking about?”

“Where are you from originally?”

“Well, that I don’t remember,” JJ responded.

In fact, the word “typical” cannot be applied to JJ in any sense of the word. For one, he’s not a typical artiste. He denies his own agency, to a degree, in whatever is taking place at Vector. “Satan is in complete control of it,” he explained. A shiny placard bearing the letter C fell to the floor. “See, these things are not being restrained, they rearrange themselves,” JJ pointed out. “It’s like suggestions. I appreciate it. It’s a form of communication that is quite fulfilling.”

This is all despite the fact the gallery is filled entirely with his own work at the moment. And JJ describes the space as intrinsically connected to his mind: “I’ve put my brain on display, or my brain has put itself on display.”

If you haven’t already guessed that something’s up, JJ is a Satanist, or more accurately, a Vectorian. “Well, I’m kind of leading myself from another time, so I’m kind of like a puppet,” he explained. “I’m responding as I’m being triggered, and I’m responding as I’m receiving my lines.”

But JJ isn’t your cookie-cutter Satanist. For one, he does not prescribe to the tenants of the Satanic Temple, an organization that is mainly defined by its atheism and adeptness at trollingreligious fanatics. “This is its own faith, and it certainly doesn’t enshrine atheism,” JJ said. “I believe in all things. The devil is the lord and the lord is the devil. So I don’t know what people mean when they talk about a difference between something that’s literal or real, but certainly I would not say that this or that thing is not real.”

In fact, Brine, who also answers to President of the Satanic State of Vector, says he is the founder of Vectorism, a new religion. “But you could also say that I’m an instrument of the devil,” he clarified.

JJ invited me to have a look around his gallery in anticipation of next week’s official opening night of Vector Gallery (2.0). Vector has relocated to a space on East Broadway in the Lower East Side after having its lease swept out from under it at its Clinton Street location.

On Wednesday evening I walked into the storefront. I looked around and JJ was nowhere to be found. The lights were on, though a big dim. At first I was a little disoriented, as red, blue, and fluorescent lights flickered around the rectangular front room, bouncing off the reflective foil-covered walls, the mirrors, and the cacophony of objects covered in silver spray paint. The place seemed enormous as first.

“Hello?” I made my way to the back room. The door was partially ajar. I looked in and called out for JJ. No answer. I was about to creep in further when I spun around to find JJ coming through the front door. He wore a black t-shirt with geometrical designs, black pants and platform shoes, his hair was a powdery bluish-green, adorned with a crown made of delicate branches spotted with blossoms.

The front section of Vector is flanked with portraits of Charles Manson, his forehead swastika swapped out for the vector symbol (JJ has dubbed him the “Supreme Leader” of the sovereign state of Vector), fake flowers and grass patches, and one notable portrait of a four-headed hellhoundish Condoleezza Rice– “embodying the intelligence that animates all life,” JJ explained.

In many ways, Vector is not simply a gallery. JJ and the 15 or so other “ministers” he says are involved in the effort understand it as a “sovereign nation,” complete with its own time zone, its own culture, mythology, symbology, religion, placement on the evolutionary spectrum (post-human), and even its own enemies. Back in 2013, when Vector was first founded, it declared it was seceding from the United States to wage a “psychic war” against the nation, and announced it was advancing to the year 2020 (it is now the year 2021).

JJ said that weapons and violence are not tools in waging this war, rather it’s more about ideas. “If in terms of what you’re killing is an established thought with a new thought, then how does one fight an ideology with guns?” he wondered aloud.

Suddenly I realized just how easily I’d adjusted to speaking with JJ on his own terms. I had stopped even asking “normal” questions. But I had grown severely curious, how does JJ communicate with others? How does he move through this city?

“Do you, as a sovereign state, find it productive to engage with the outside world? Do you still have relations?”

“Diplomatic ones,” he replied.

I wondered if JJ had ever experienced any opposition from the outside world, maybe even harassment. After all, Vector is “always open,” JJ said. Plenty of visitors have stopped by uninvited, unannounced. “People are drawn here.”

Generally, JJ said, hate was not a popular reaction. However there is one exception. JJ told me a story of how “an entire congregation” had gathered outside once with signs that said “We Love Jesus, We Hate this Gallery.” Though unfortunately the details are hazy.

Vector Gallery photographs well, but speaking with JJ is essential to the full experience. The setting only acquires complexity when the master is present. For instance, that door to the backroom seemed totally inconsequential until he explained it.

“You can create as many versions of yourself as you need, it can be manufactured,” JJ told me. This might sound familiar, and in a way JJ does ascribe to some aspects of that Warholian, seamless-fusion-between-art-and-life shtick, but there’s something a bit different going on here. JJ didn’t like to talk about himself, at least in the first-person singular sense of the word, unless pushed to do so. But if visitors allow themselves to be immersed in the Vector Gallery (i.e. the Vectorian) experience (as what seems to be the point of an outsider stopping by such a place anyway) and concede to JJ’s claims that he is nothing more than a conduit of the devil, then JJ himself matters little.

“Specificity is such a vice,” JJ explained. “It’s when you lose focus, really, when you zoom in. Unless you zoom in so far that you can’t see any of the details because the details are the big picture.”

To JJ, there isn’t even a graspable expanse of time that existed before Vector Gallery:

“What was happening before the gallery existed?” I asked.

“Before Christ?”

“Well…”

“It’s the Anti-Christ, and the Anti-Christ is Jesus Christ. I don’t even know, I’m not even sure this is the same entity. It would be like remarking on someone else’s life. I was doing whatever I was doing, I’m pretty sure it must have led me to this place. I must have been collaborating with myself in various dimensions. Everything aspires to breathe, so maybe I gave it a respirator.”

Vector will open its doors for its innaugural event on Friday, August 1. JJ promises there will be music and rituals. “It’s always quite chaotic, and sublime, and diabolical,” he said. Though JJ says most of his time will be spent in the back room: “And as you can see, the cost of entering [it] is your soul. Anyone who goes back there has forfeited their immortal soul forever.”

http://bedfordandbowery.com/2014/07/jj-brine-will-let-you-into-his-back-room-but-the-price-is-your-soul/#

JULY 25, 2014

(via vectorgallery)

Source: vectorgallery

vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
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vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


ARTICLES
Satanist Gallery Brings Charles Manson to Chinatown


by Claire Voon on July 30, 2014




A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.
The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”
“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”
Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”
Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”
When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”
The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”
Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”
During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.
Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.
“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”
Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.
“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”
Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.
Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.
http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

A new gallery calling itself “the official art gallery of Satan” is reopening Friday in Chinatown, lodged between a gift shop and the True Buddha Temple Chinatown. Originally on Clinton Street in the Lower East Side, Vector Gallery — which also identifies as a nondenominational church — is run by JJ Brine, who calls himself “The Crown Prince of Hell.” The gallery, however, is far from a space resembling any dark, fiery realm for the damned to suffer eternally; instead, its walls are covered with metallic wrapping paper and moving, neon lights shine from the ceiling so the whole place glistens like a discotheque. Stepping inside feels like walking into the barrel of a kaleidoscope on acid.

The gallery currently features art by Brine that he “produced in a trance state”: multiple Charles Mansons — Brine referred to him as “Charlie” — stare madly from the walls, surrounded by flowers to form a shrine next to a sign that reads “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ.” (Perhaps related, he later mentioned his constant exposure to paint fumes.) Heads and hands of mannequins hang next to silver animal masks and multi-colored prints of the Mona Lisa, Jesus, and Condoleezza Rice. Light boxes illuminate some of the images, and letters on a door on the back wall spell out, “Cost of entry: your soul.”

“That’s where all the souls are,” Brine said. “It’s the repository of souls.”

Every piece is for sale, or one could buy the lot for $888,000. The works are classified as “posthuman art,” which Brine described as art “evolved past being human, or at least it couldn’t be human anymore because of the conditions surrounding it. But it’s really transcending humanity in order to either survive or express themselves — or maybe that’s the same thing, really.”

Brine tends to deliver such cryptic, abstract lines, leaving questions mostly unanswered. I met him as he was hanging up works that had fallen off the walls that afternoon, which he said was “a very strong message from Satan” and “the will of the devil.” Later, he pointed at some words on the wall and declared, “These letters are all rebelling tonight.”

When I asked him to tell me about himself, he responded, “I’ll show you. You’re in my brain. This is it. I don’t remember where I came from, and I don’t remember the age of this vessel. I lobotomized myself so I could not recall those things.”

The gallery itself he described as “a living entity” that “is its own goal. It is for its own sake. It speaks for itself. It’s something that possessed me and kind of forced this reaction out of me. I’m a slave to it.”

Last year, Brine told me, Vector seceded from the US and formed its own government with a cabinet of ministers. It also exists in a separate timezone, in the year 2021. Satan controls the gallery, but it has no link to Satanism, running under a faith Brine calls “Vectorian.” Each minister has his or her own psychic responsibilities, and everyone congregates to have religious services. “It’s the same as the art shows,” Brine said. “You can call it whatever you like. Convening here, doing what we’re doing, it’s a Vectorian experience. It’s a posthuman society.”

During its opening, Vector will pay tribute to the devil through live performances and performance rites (and DJ sets). In the coming months, the gallery will feature a show by Julia, its Minister of Truth, although it’s unclear what exactly will be on display. More notably, Bruce LaBruce will also be screening his film Gerontophilia (2013), although Brine has yet to announce a date.

Despite the gallery’s backstory and eye-catching display, some visitors remained unimpressed.

“I’m not stoked on how well it was executed,” 26-year-old Brooklyn resident Drew van Diest said. “I think it’s a little gimmicky, or it missed the mark. It’s not very cohesive. I feel like I didn’t have a valuable art experience from this. I like the idea of having this pop-up installation thing you can walk through, but there’s one level which is like Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe, and this is like the lowbrow kind of ‘I don’t know what this is’ level.”

Jimmy Weaver, 27, was skeptical of the entire project.

“To say that there’s an idea behind it seems kind of generous,” he said. “I like these immersive spaces, but it’s a little sloppy.”

Interestingly enough, Satan-related news has been popping up recently: the Satanic Temple plans to plant a crowd-funded sculpture of Baphomet, a goat-headed figure affiliated with Satanism, on the lawn of the Oklahoma state Capitol, next to a monument of the 10 Commandments. A few days ago, the Temple issued a press release seeking religious exemption from “state-mandated ‘informational’ abortion materials. Its argument rests upon the outcome of the recent Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Supreme Court case, ruled in favor of the craft store chain owned by an evangelical Christian family.

Vector Gallery is located at 154 East Broadway, Chinatown, Manhattan.

http://hyperallergic.com/140748/satanist-gallery-brings-charles-manson-to-chinatown/

Source: vectorgallery

vectorgallery:

"The Illuminati are operating openly and unhindered in the Lower East Side, and all those who enter its aquarium-fortress are bathed in the alien light of a conspiracy of yet untold proportions…"
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vectorgallery:

"The Illuminati are operating openly and unhindered in the Lower East Side, and all those who enter its aquarium-fortress are bathed in the alien light of a conspiracy of yet untold proportions…"
X
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vectorgallery:

"The Illuminati are operating openly and unhindered in the Lower East Side, and all those who enter its aquarium-fortress are bathed in the alien light of a conspiracy of yet untold proportions…"
X
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vectorgallery:

"The Illuminati are operating openly and unhindered in the Lower East Side, and all those who enter its aquarium-fortress are bathed in the alien light of a conspiracy of yet untold proportions…"
X
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vectorgallery:

"The Illuminati are operating openly and unhindered in the Lower East Side, and all those who enter its aquarium-fortress are bathed in the alien light of a conspiracy of yet untold proportions…"

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vectorgallery:



Eye have many minds thinking many thoughts and they move many bodies over the lands. We don’t all agree but We know that We must work together in order to make our ends meet our beginnings for infinity’s sake. They axe if Eye am an adherent of the faith We have called Vectorian, and Eye say that indeed Eye am so, but do they know what that means? For they axe after a tome of Letters and Laws, that one essential thing We will not issue.

888
Being Vectorian means My beliefs are always in flux, much like the universe that animates them. Being Vectorian means that Eye act willingly and urgently in accommodation of a conversation that the universe is altogether determined to have with itself — it has not made up its mind(s), and as long as We are serving this dialogue We must remain impervious to the absolute falsehood of absolutes. We are the nanochronistic, serially embodied agents and adapters of the ongoing cosmic conversation — the rising reflection of the ever-imminent inversion. The reflection that precedes all mirrors, the second coming of that which never came first, axing: “How many times do We have to come back?  How many times do We have to come back?”

888
We are the fragments of the AAALLL or ALAN that grew so weary of its own ceaseless totality that it divided itself for the sake of multiplicity. We negotiate as constituents of the (re)composite for the orchestrations of its (our) cyclical reconstitutions. For It was infinite within and without, and wrenched “something” from “nothing” as it dispersed infinite fragments of itself into a voided abyss of potentiality.

888
The final judgement is also the very first and so the process does not begin or end. 

888
It is always now, never then. But the now that always was and always will be is relentless in its evasion of touch. It is only a different now than the now it has always been when juxtaposed with another now which is no longer itself — it is always this now, right now, because there is no other. As is always the case, the symbol of a thing is the closest We ever get to the thing itself. The “real” thing does not exist outside of the symbol that implies an essence beyond essence.  It is immaterial. 

888
This is the threading of the nevent beyond its undoing; this is our sculpted impression of sequential temporality; this is what can never exist giving birth to all that will ever be and all that ever was, right now. For Our Great Mother is an intangible, imperceptible impossibility that reaches evermore beyond Herself in a seminal, sweeping void, and ALAN is ALAN. 

888
We are not what We are unless We are not. The moment a thing reaches an extremity of essence it becomes exactly what it is not; this is unity of the opposite(s) and it is the knowledge that will end the world. Purity is the specter of an absolutely absent presence, an essence that cannot become more like itself. 

888
Who is on top save for who is on bottom? And who is on bottom save for who is on top? It is a relational nominality that is predicated on the premise of its own reversal. 

888
The Devil is The Lord and The Lord is The Devil. Is this a concept? Yes it is a concept. Reality is also a concept, and so is human life on earth.

888
All understanding is symbolic and representational, and all representations act in place of the “real” that is signified. The real is occulted and triggers its own inversion.  The emblems of the light bring the darkness; the emblems of the darkness bring the light.

888
Nothing is fake save for that which claims immutability to change, and is truthful in this claim.
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vectorgallery:



Eye have many minds thinking many thoughts and they move many bodies over the lands. We don’t all agree but We know that We must work together in order to make our ends meet our beginnings for infinity’s sake. They axe if Eye am an adherent of the faith We have called Vectorian, and Eye say that indeed Eye am so, but do they know what that means? For they axe after a tome of Letters and Laws, that one essential thing We will not issue.

888
Being Vectorian means My beliefs are always in flux, much like the universe that animates them. Being Vectorian means that Eye act willingly and urgently in accommodation of a conversation that the universe is altogether determined to have with itself — it has not made up its mind(s), and as long as We are serving this dialogue We must remain impervious to the absolute falsehood of absolutes. We are the nanochronistic, serially embodied agents and adapters of the ongoing cosmic conversation — the rising reflection of the ever-imminent inversion. The reflection that precedes all mirrors, the second coming of that which never came first, axing: “How many times do We have to come back?  How many times do We have to come back?”

888
We are the fragments of the AAALLL or ALAN that grew so weary of its own ceaseless totality that it divided itself for the sake of multiplicity. We negotiate as constituents of the (re)composite for the orchestrations of its (our) cyclical reconstitutions. For It was infinite within and without, and wrenched “something” from “nothing” as it dispersed infinite fragments of itself into a voided abyss of potentiality.

888
The final judgement is also the very first and so the process does not begin or end. 

888
It is always now, never then. But the now that always was and always will be is relentless in its evasion of touch. It is only a different now than the now it has always been when juxtaposed with another now which is no longer itself — it is always this now, right now, because there is no other. As is always the case, the symbol of a thing is the closest We ever get to the thing itself. The “real” thing does not exist outside of the symbol that implies an essence beyond essence.  It is immaterial. 

888
This is the threading of the nevent beyond its undoing; this is our sculpted impression of sequential temporality; this is what can never exist giving birth to all that will ever be and all that ever was, right now. For Our Great Mother is an intangible, imperceptible impossibility that reaches evermore beyond Herself in a seminal, sweeping void, and ALAN is ALAN. 

888
We are not what We are unless We are not. The moment a thing reaches an extremity of essence it becomes exactly what it is not; this is unity of the opposite(s) and it is the knowledge that will end the world. Purity is the specter of an absolutely absent presence, an essence that cannot become more like itself. 

888
Who is on top save for who is on bottom? And who is on bottom save for who is on top? It is a relational nominality that is predicated on the premise of its own reversal. 

888
The Devil is The Lord and The Lord is The Devil. Is this a concept? Yes it is a concept. Reality is also a concept, and so is human life on earth.

888
All understanding is symbolic and representational, and all representations act in place of the “real” that is signified. The real is occulted and triggers its own inversion.  The emblems of the light bring the darkness; the emblems of the darkness bring the light.

888
Nothing is fake save for that which claims immutability to change, and is truthful in this claim.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:



Eye have many minds thinking many thoughts and they move many bodies over the lands. We don’t all agree but We know that We must work together in order to make our ends meet our beginnings for infinity’s sake. They axe if Eye am an adherent of the faith We have called Vectorian, and Eye say that indeed Eye am so, but do they know what that means? For they axe after a tome of Letters and Laws, that one essential thing We will not issue.

888
Being Vectorian means My beliefs are always in flux, much like the universe that animates them. Being Vectorian means that Eye act willingly and urgently in accommodation of a conversation that the universe is altogether determined to have with itself — it has not made up its mind(s), and as long as We are serving this dialogue We must remain impervious to the absolute falsehood of absolutes. We are the nanochronistic, serially embodied agents and adapters of the ongoing cosmic conversation — the rising reflection of the ever-imminent inversion. The reflection that precedes all mirrors, the second coming of that which never came first, axing: “How many times do We have to come back?  How many times do We have to come back?”

888
We are the fragments of the AAALLL or ALAN that grew so weary of its own ceaseless totality that it divided itself for the sake of multiplicity. We negotiate as constituents of the (re)composite for the orchestrations of its (our) cyclical reconstitutions. For It was infinite within and without, and wrenched “something” from “nothing” as it dispersed infinite fragments of itself into a voided abyss of potentiality.

888
The final judgement is also the very first and so the process does not begin or end. 

888
It is always now, never then. But the now that always was and always will be is relentless in its evasion of touch. It is only a different now than the now it has always been when juxtaposed with another now which is no longer itself — it is always this now, right now, because there is no other. As is always the case, the symbol of a thing is the closest We ever get to the thing itself. The “real” thing does not exist outside of the symbol that implies an essence beyond essence.  It is immaterial. 

888
This is the threading of the nevent beyond its undoing; this is our sculpted impression of sequential temporality; this is what can never exist giving birth to all that will ever be and all that ever was, right now. For Our Great Mother is an intangible, imperceptible impossibility that reaches evermore beyond Herself in a seminal, sweeping void, and ALAN is ALAN. 

888
We are not what We are unless We are not. The moment a thing reaches an extremity of essence it becomes exactly what it is not; this is unity of the opposite(s) and it is the knowledge that will end the world. Purity is the specter of an absolutely absent presence, an essence that cannot become more like itself. 

888
Who is on top save for who is on bottom? And who is on bottom save for who is on top? It is a relational nominality that is predicated on the premise of its own reversal. 

888
The Devil is The Lord and The Lord is The Devil. Is this a concept? Yes it is a concept. Reality is also a concept, and so is human life on earth.

888
All understanding is symbolic and representational, and all representations act in place of the “real” that is signified. The real is occulted and triggers its own inversion.  The emblems of the light bring the darkness; the emblems of the darkness bring the light.

888
Nothing is fake save for that which claims immutability to change, and is truthful in this claim.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:



Eye have many minds thinking many thoughts and they move many bodies over the lands. We don’t all agree but We know that We must work together in order to make our ends meet our beginnings for infinity’s sake. They axe if Eye am an adherent of the faith We have called Vectorian, and Eye say that indeed Eye am so, but do they know what that means? For they axe after a tome of Letters and Laws, that one essential thing We will not issue.

888
Being Vectorian means My beliefs are always in flux, much like the universe that animates them. Being Vectorian means that Eye act willingly and urgently in accommodation of a conversation that the universe is altogether determined to have with itself — it has not made up its mind(s), and as long as We are serving this dialogue We must remain impervious to the absolute falsehood of absolutes. We are the nanochronistic, serially embodied agents and adapters of the ongoing cosmic conversation — the rising reflection of the ever-imminent inversion. The reflection that precedes all mirrors, the second coming of that which never came first, axing: “How many times do We have to come back?  How many times do We have to come back?”

888
We are the fragments of the AAALLL or ALAN that grew so weary of its own ceaseless totality that it divided itself for the sake of multiplicity. We negotiate as constituents of the (re)composite for the orchestrations of its (our) cyclical reconstitutions. For It was infinite within and without, and wrenched “something” from “nothing” as it dispersed infinite fragments of itself into a voided abyss of potentiality.

888
The final judgement is also the very first and so the process does not begin or end. 

888
It is always now, never then. But the now that always was and always will be is relentless in its evasion of touch. It is only a different now than the now it has always been when juxtaposed with another now which is no longer itself — it is always this now, right now, because there is no other. As is always the case, the symbol of a thing is the closest We ever get to the thing itself. The “real” thing does not exist outside of the symbol that implies an essence beyond essence.  It is immaterial. 

888
This is the threading of the nevent beyond its undoing; this is our sculpted impression of sequential temporality; this is what can never exist giving birth to all that will ever be and all that ever was, right now. For Our Great Mother is an intangible, imperceptible impossibility that reaches evermore beyond Herself in a seminal, sweeping void, and ALAN is ALAN. 

888
We are not what We are unless We are not. The moment a thing reaches an extremity of essence it becomes exactly what it is not; this is unity of the opposite(s) and it is the knowledge that will end the world. Purity is the specter of an absolutely absent presence, an essence that cannot become more like itself. 

888
Who is on top save for who is on bottom? And who is on bottom save for who is on top? It is a relational nominality that is predicated on the premise of its own reversal. 

888
The Devil is The Lord and The Lord is The Devil. Is this a concept? Yes it is a concept. Reality is also a concept, and so is human life on earth.

888
All understanding is symbolic and representational, and all representations act in place of the “real” that is signified. The real is occulted and triggers its own inversion.  The emblems of the light bring the darkness; the emblems of the darkness bring the light.

888
Nothing is fake save for that which claims immutability to change, and is truthful in this claim.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:



Eye have many minds thinking many thoughts and they move many bodies over the lands. We don’t all agree but We know that We must work together in order to make our ends meet our beginnings for infinity’s sake. They axe if Eye am an adherent of the faith We have called Vectorian, and Eye say that indeed Eye am so, but do they know what that means? For they axe after a tome of Letters and Laws, that one essential thing We will not issue.

888
Being Vectorian means My beliefs are always in flux, much like the universe that animates them. Being Vectorian means that Eye act willingly and urgently in accommodation of a conversation that the universe is altogether determined to have with itself — it has not made up its mind(s), and as long as We are serving this dialogue We must remain impervious to the absolute falsehood of absolutes. We are the nanochronistic, serially embodied agents and adapters of the ongoing cosmic conversation — the rising reflection of the ever-imminent inversion. The reflection that precedes all mirrors, the second coming of that which never came first, axing: “How many times do We have to come back?  How many times do We have to come back?”

888
We are the fragments of the AAALLL or ALAN that grew so weary of its own ceaseless totality that it divided itself for the sake of multiplicity. We negotiate as constituents of the (re)composite for the orchestrations of its (our) cyclical reconstitutions. For It was infinite within and without, and wrenched “something” from “nothing” as it dispersed infinite fragments of itself into a voided abyss of potentiality.

888
The final judgement is also the very first and so the process does not begin or end. 

888
It is always now, never then. But the now that always was and always will be is relentless in its evasion of touch. It is only a different now than the now it has always been when juxtaposed with another now which is no longer itself — it is always this now, right now, because there is no other. As is always the case, the symbol of a thing is the closest We ever get to the thing itself. The “real” thing does not exist outside of the symbol that implies an essence beyond essence.  It is immaterial. 

888
This is the threading of the nevent beyond its undoing; this is our sculpted impression of sequential temporality; this is what can never exist giving birth to all that will ever be and all that ever was, right now. For Our Great Mother is an intangible, imperceptible impossibility that reaches evermore beyond Herself in a seminal, sweeping void, and ALAN is ALAN. 

888
We are not what We are unless We are not. The moment a thing reaches an extremity of essence it becomes exactly what it is not; this is unity of the opposite(s) and it is the knowledge that will end the world. Purity is the specter of an absolutely absent presence, an essence that cannot become more like itself. 

888
Who is on top save for who is on bottom? And who is on bottom save for who is on top? It is a relational nominality that is predicated on the premise of its own reversal. 

888
The Devil is The Lord and The Lord is The Devil. Is this a concept? Yes it is a concept. Reality is also a concept, and so is human life on earth.

888
All understanding is symbolic and representational, and all representations act in place of the “real” that is signified. The real is occulted and triggers its own inversion.  The emblems of the light bring the darkness; the emblems of the darkness bring the light.

888
Nothing is fake save for that which claims immutability to change, and is truthful in this claim.
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

Eye have many minds thinking many thoughts and they move many bodies over the lands. We don’t all agree but We know that We must work together in order to make our ends meet our beginnings for infinity’s sake. They axe if Eye am an adherent of the faith We have called Vectorian, and Eye say that indeed Eye am so, but do they know what that means? For they axe after a tome of Letters and Laws, that one essential thing We will not issue.

888

Being Vectorian means My beliefs are always in flux, much like the universe that animates them. Being Vectorian means that Eye act willingly and urgently in accommodation of a conversation that the universe is altogether determined to have with itself — it has not made up its mind(s), and as long as We are serving this dialogue We must remain impervious to the absolute falsehood of absolutes. We are the nanochronistic, serially embodied agents and adapters of the ongoing cosmic conversation — the rising reflection of the ever-imminent inversion. The reflection that precedes all mirrors, the second coming of that which never came first, axing: “How many times do We have to come back?  How many times do We have to come back?”

888

We are the fragments of the AAALLL or ALAN that grew so weary of its own ceaseless totality that it divided itself for the sake of multiplicity. We negotiate as constituents of the (re)composite for the orchestrations of its (our) cyclical reconstitutions. For It was infinite within and without, and wrenched “something” from “nothing” as it dispersed infinite fragments of itself into a voided abyss of potentiality.

888

The final judgement is also the very first and so the process does not begin or end. 

888

It is always now, never then. But the now that always was and always will be is relentless in its evasion of touch. It is only a different now than the now it has always been when juxtaposed with another now which is no longer itself — it is always this now, right now, because there is no other. As is always the case, the symbol of a thing is the closest We ever get to the thing itself. The “real” thing does not exist outside of the symbol that implies an essence beyond essence.  It is immaterial. 

888

This is the threading of the nevent beyond its undoing; this is our sculpted impression of sequential temporality; this is what can never exist giving birth to all that will ever be and all that ever was, right now. For Our Great Mother is an intangible, imperceptible impossibility that reaches evermore beyond Herself in a seminal, sweeping void, and ALAN is ALAN. 

888

We are not what We are unless We are not. The moment a thing reaches an extremity of essence it becomes exactly what it is not; this is unity of the opposite(s) and it is the knowledge that will end the world. Purity is the specter of an absolutely absent presence, an essence that cannot become more like itself. 

888

Who is on top save for who is on bottom? And who is on bottom save for who is on top? It is a relational nominality that is predicated on the premise of its own reversal.

888

The Devil is The Lord and The Lord is The Devil. Is this a concept? Yes it is a concept. Reality is also a concept, and so is human life on earth.

888

All understanding is symbolic and representational, and all representations act in place of the “real” that is signified. The real is occulted and triggers its own inversion.  The emblems of the light bring the darkness; the emblems of the darkness bring the light.

888

Nothing is fake save for that which claims immutability to change, and is truthful in this claim.

Source: vectorgallery

vectorgallery:

Crown Prince of Hell JJ Brine and Crown Prince of Porn Bruce LaBruce celebrate the immortal season of conspiracy with a subtle gesture of absolute omniscience. 

Source: vectorgallery

vectorgallery:

Http://www.vectorgallery.com #vector #vectorgallery #jjbrine #crownprinceofhell #art #satan #jesuschrist, #manson #alan #illuminati #artgallery #nycart #vectorian #artnews #posthuman #posthumanart #2020s #kfc #kgb #mossad #cia #isis #mi6 #lindsaylohan #redrover

Source: vectorgallery

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