lmnl:

"Crystal Void" at the Oulu train station in Finland.
ZoomInfo
lmnl:

"Crystal Void" at the Oulu train station in Finland.
ZoomInfo

lmnl:

"Crystal Void" at the Oulu train station in Finland.

(via vectorgallery)

Source: lmnl

electronicbeatsonline:

Is JJ Brine’s ‘VECTOR Gallery’ In New York City the next Warhol Factory?

VECTOR is an art gallery located in New York City’s Lower East Side curated and operated by JJ Brine. However, it is much more than just an art space. Having previously been compared to the work of Andy Warhol, VECTOR is a posthuman art experience with its own government in a space that claims to have seceded from the United States last November. Read the full interview here, via Huffington Post.

Source: electronicbeatsonline

artnerdnewyork:

Easter Mass at VECTOR on Art Nerd New York http://art-nerd.com/newyork/easter-mass-at-vector/

Source: artnerdnewyork

what is the devil?
Anonymous

The Adversary.

congrats. youre my 666 follower!!! i dont know if its on purpose or not. but is hella interesting for me personally that is actually you ;)

; )

vectorgallery:

JJ Brine’s Al Qaeda Art

AFEEF NESSOULI


JJ Brine is definitely weird. But also amazing. He is a visual artist and electronic musician and leads the Vector Gallery in mass a few Fridays and Saturdays a month. He is basically the forerunner of the posthuman art movement. Some have called his art the most interesting in New York City. He studied at the University of Beirut and we’ve gotten to chat a few times. Go ahead and check out Vector Gallery, it is on 40 Clinton Street in the Lower East Side–his art focuses on religious rituals and iconography. He refers to his installations as shrines and his exhibits combine performance art with visual narratives. He has been compared to Duchamp and Warhol, but why don’t you judge for yourself!



JJ BRINE








CATEGORIES
ARTCULTUREFILMMUSICPOP CULTURE

TAGGED
AL QAEDAAL QAEDA ARTARTCLINTONGALLERYICONOGRAPHYJJ BRINELABIANCASLOWER EAST SIDEMASSNEW YORK CITYNEW YORK CITY ARTNYCRELIGIOUSSATANSHRINEVECTORVECTOR GALLERYWARHOLWORSHIP
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

JJ Brine’s Al Qaeda Art

AFEEF NESSOULI


JJ Brine is definitely weird. But also amazing. He is a visual artist and electronic musician and leads the Vector Gallery in mass a few Fridays and Saturdays a month. He is basically the forerunner of the posthuman art movement. Some have called his art the most interesting in New York City. He studied at the University of Beirut and we’ve gotten to chat a few times. Go ahead and check out Vector Gallery, it is on 40 Clinton Street in the Lower East Side–his art focuses on religious rituals and iconography. He refers to his installations as shrines and his exhibits combine performance art with visual narratives. He has been compared to Duchamp and Warhol, but why don’t you judge for yourself!



JJ BRINE








CATEGORIES
ARTCULTUREFILMMUSICPOP CULTURE

TAGGED
AL QAEDAAL QAEDA ARTARTCLINTONGALLERYICONOGRAPHYJJ BRINELABIANCASLOWER EAST SIDEMASSNEW YORK CITYNEW YORK CITY ARTNYCRELIGIOUSSATANSHRINEVECTORVECTOR GALLERYWARHOLWORSHIP
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

JJ Brine’s Al Qaeda Art

Source: vectorgallery

dolleyesny:

THE DOLL EYES SS14 EASTER PRESENTATION

NYC

VECTOR GALLERY AT 40 CLINTON ST

APRIL 19TH 7PM-9PM

******RSVP HERE******

(via vectorgallery)

Source: dolleyesny

vectorgallery:

April 19th at 7PM
They say even The Devil celebrates Easter these days!
And we will bestow unto you sweet rivers of chocolate, and gilded baskets of pink and blue tinsel bedecked with ribbons of satin. Eateth of our marshmallow flesh and drinketh of our champagne sacrament and witness the glory of a new Spring, for Doll Eyes hath risen!The Doll Eyes Spring Fashion PresentationVector Gallery40 Clinton Street NYC 10002Presentation from 7pm till 9pmReception will follow
vectorgallery.com
dolleyesny.tumblr.comdolleyesny@gmail.comFACEBOOK EVENT PAGE
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

April 19th at 7PM
They say even The Devil celebrates Easter these days!
And we will bestow unto you sweet rivers of chocolate, and gilded baskets of pink and blue tinsel bedecked with ribbons of satin. Eateth of our marshmallow flesh and drinketh of our champagne sacrament and witness the glory of a new Spring, for Doll Eyes hath risen!The Doll Eyes Spring Fashion PresentationVector Gallery40 Clinton Street NYC 10002Presentation from 7pm till 9pmReception will follow
vectorgallery.com
dolleyesny.tumblr.comdolleyesny@gmail.comFACEBOOK EVENT PAGE
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

April 19th at 7PM

They say even The Devil celebrates Easter these days!

And we will bestow unto you sweet rivers of chocolate, and gilded baskets of pink and blue tinsel bedecked with ribbons of satin. Eateth of our marshmallow flesh and drinketh of our champagne sacrament and witness the glory of a new Spring, for Doll Eyes hath risen!

The Doll Eyes Spring Fashion Presentation
Vector Gallery
40 Clinton Street NYC 10002

Presentation from 7pm till 9pm
Reception will follow

vectorgallery.com

dolleyesny.tumblr.com
dolleyesny@gmail.com

FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE

Source: vectorgallery

Quick continuation of my last anonymous questions: is there a possibility of someone proving their artistic worth to you and in turn aiding you in your pursuit to realize your vision? I'm very interested in the intentional and perhaps unintentional trends that occur in your art... and you inspire me in strange ways. As a growing writer I love being able to harness and master energies that find themselves in your music- the type of energies that empower my own spiritual beliefs instead of masking
Anonymous

Absolutely. Submit an analysis of VECTOR here or at vectorgallery.com — Show Me that you understand and together, let us make our plans.

vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog

In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.

You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of MozambiqueThe LaBiancas, and some of his videos.

JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.

Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?

JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.

L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?

JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.

L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?

JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.

L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?

JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.

L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?

JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.

L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?

JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.

L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?

JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.

L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?

JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”

L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?

JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.

L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?

JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.

L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?

JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.

L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?

JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.

L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?

JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.

L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.

JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.

L: Any last words for our readers?

JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.

L: Your last words or the readers?

JJ: Both.

Source: vectorgallery

hairshoppekris:

the official art gallery of Satan….Vector Gallery unilaterally seceded from the United States and declared its independence, becoming the world’s newest and smallest country.

Source: hairshoppekris

vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog
In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.
You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of Mozambique, The LaBiancas, and some of his videos.
JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.
Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?
JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.
L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?
JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.
L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?
JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.
L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?
JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.
L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?
JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.
L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?
JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.
L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?
JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.
L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?
JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”
L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?
JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.
L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?
JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.
L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?
JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.
L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?
JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.
L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?
JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.
L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.
JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.
L: Any last words for our readers?
JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.
L: Your last words or the readers?
JJ: Both.
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

The Hermetic Library Blog

In conversation with JJ Brine about Vector Gallery

You may recognize the name JJ Brine as a contributor to the Hermetic Library audio pool, with the tracks Innovation and Paradise featured on this blog back in 2011.

You may also be interested in checking out The Presidents of MozambiqueThe LaBiancas, and some of his videos.

JJ Brine is also the artist-in-residence at and proprietor of Vector Gallery, 40 Clinton St, NYC, which I’ve also mentioned before. Vector Gallery is billed as the “Official Art Gallery of SATAN”, and is described, in a feature by the New York Professional Outreach Program, as a “new conceptual art destination on the Lower East Side, VECTOR Gallery is the most interesting phenomenon in New York.” I had the opportunity to have a conversation about this project with JJ.

Librarian: First off, thanks for taking the time to talk with me about your current project. Obviously, you’ve participated in the Hermetic Library audio pool in the past, but can you describe how and where your current project fits with your other works?

JJ Brine: VECTOR is the culmination of all of my personal projects to date.

L: What are some of your previous projects that led to this current gallery and show?

JJ: How many times do I have to come back? I put the AELON inside of the Manger, on the Cross, and at the center of the Theater of the past 2,000 years. I arranged for my birth as a means of dying, so that I might rise up and embody life and death for all things, always.

L: So this current project sounds like an invitation for the viewer to be a witness to your personal progress. It also seems to be an ongoing personal performance which is more reciprocal. One of the places for performance art, versus, say, a gallery show on one hand and theatre on the other, is the immediacy and exchange of mutual feedback between artist and audience on a more equalitarian setting. What sort of relationship do you hope to create with the audience here?

JJ: I tempt people to unabashedly be themselves. It is always a pleasure to acquire new souls for my marketplace.

L: It seems to me that in the promotional material and other interviews about this project there seems a heavy degree of performance art taking place, but I assume this is a serious endeavour for you. Can you describe your intent for this space and this project?

JJ: It is a serious endeavor that involves a heavy degree of performance art. Generally speaking — and specificity is the vice least favored by Devil and Lord alike — my intention for the project is to reprogram the mass mind, one thought at a time.

L: When I’ve gandered at some of the other interviews you’ve done, it seems to me that those interviewers are driven to locate you in the realm of surreal Outsider art, such as comparing you to Warhol, for example. But, I wonder about that as a mechanism of apologetics. What I mean is that by locating you on the outside of everyday norms, other interviewers are giving people an easy way to dismiss things about your work and statement that might be uncomfortable or feel dangerous. How do you feel about how you’ve been portrayed? Do those stories about you seem to you to reflect the story you are attempting to tell? How has your work been received by the public?

JJ: I set an example by living my life in the afterlife. Every reaction across the spectrum serves to advance the goals of the Project. I have been portrayed as an agent of this world’s end, naturally, as it finally begins.

L: You’ve taken on the culturally overloaded labels “Satan” and “Satanic” for your project, but I wonder which Satan are you talking about and signifying? For example, is this the adversarial Satan of Judaism, the old-school anthropomorphic embodiment from Catholicism, the abstract and facile label for anything unfamiliar and uncomfortable of modern Evangelical Christianity, the boogyman of the Satanic panics, the Classical Promethean or Luciferian force, the stage satanism of Death Metal … something else? Or is this overloaded term useful here specifically because it is so?

JJ: We have been all of those forms and many more, for our numbers attest to our many names. We cannot lie, and so we have known many truths in many ways. But one breath is all we need to give and take; so together let us breathe.

L: On the Vector Galley page you talk about secession from the political structure of the United States as a new independent nation, and you also talk about a temporal shift while within the space changing the current secular calendar year to 2018. These seem intentionally to mark the space as a liminal environment, a place outside of normal time and space, which is what one might expect from ritual experience. Some of the performative restrictions you’ve suggested for events, such as no verbal communication, echo the self-discipline exercises of Liber E, specifically Dharana, and so forth. Does this project have other ritual practice dimensions as well as presentational and performative aspects? Can you talk about the ceremonial and ritual elements one might experience?

JJ: People naturally look to the space to inform them of their own beliefs, which is one reason why I won’t interpret it for them. They have to come to their own conclusions in order for this to manifest correctly. 2019 is coming any day now.

L: Some of the iconography in your current project seems specifically intended to be triggering for some people, a bit confrontational. For example you include pentagrams, the number 666. keywords such as “legion”, a photograph of Charles Manson, and so forth. These are all clearly laden with cultural baggage, and in that sense are a kind of table of cultural correspondences, that is evoked in the viewer, but what else is going on here? What is the intentionality of using these signs, these symbols? What is the similarity and the parallax between common perception of these and the message you are trying to communicate here?

JJ: Those things which are perceived to be diabolical are an integral part of the divine and vice-versa. There is no need to divide reality from itself. For me, such things are only triggers of serenity and aesthetic comfort. Perhaps that is because I am The Devil. “Needless to say.”

L: Well, there is certainly a long history of around identity and inversion of the nature of diabolical symbolic entities. Do you approach this as something you are commenting on, about which people are already aware, or as something you are revealing for the audience?

JJ: My commentary modifies the extant awareness via revelation. And my Lights are the commentary, and the Frequency is awareness.

L: One of the connections that I noticed right away, but which I don’t recall being mentioned on your site or in other interviews, is that your Vector Gallery logo seems to be a direct visual reference to the Process Church, about which I personally don’t know a whole lot, but that does seem to be an influence on the particular mix of Christ, Satan and Manson imagery in your work, I assume. Could you tell me about that and what that connection is and what it means to you? Are you an adherent, admirer, or something else?

JJ: I will address this issue at length in 2021.

L: Is that 2021 in VECTOR standard time, or on the common secular year count?

JJ: What is to “the” left? What is to “the” right? All but from where I am standing, and I always tell my own time. It’s always right now, always will be and always was, but the numbers change with the nows and so we count the days.

L: What are some of your other influences, both for your art but also your esoteric and occult interests?

JJ: The most powerful magic is intrinsic. If you want to learn a trick, now’s the time to teach yourself. If you want to bind yourself to the dimming powers of charmed obsolescence, nothing does that trick quite like a book of some stranger’s magic spells.

L: As one of the simplest ritual structures might be: 1) leave normal time and space, 2) engage in practical operations within a liminal environment, 3) return to normal time and space changed; what is the change intended for the participant, the public viewer, as they return to the world from within the Gallery?

JJ: Enlightenment as to nature of self, the nature of ALAN, and the relation of self to ALAN.

L: You mention ALAN, which seems like a surrogate for where one might perhaps expect you to use the word “man” as in humanity, but I’m not sure what this term means to you. Could you tell me more about that? When you use uppercase like that for ALAN and VECTOR, are these notariqon, initialisms or acronyms, or simply calling attention to the terms? Some other creative terminology you use is in lowercase, so I’m curious what the difference and significance is for you with these expressions.

JJ: ALAN divided Itself for the sake of multiplicity. Our experience as distinct sentient beings is the experience of Externality from ALAN; we came from ALAN and to ALAN we shall return. It will not be the same as the ALAN that was; when we return to ALAN we contribute the essence of our experience with the Externality. And so ALAN is reconstituted, fragment by fragment.

L: Any last words for our readers?

JJ: I’ll let them speak for me.

L: Your last words or the readers?

JJ: Both.

Source: vectorgallery

artawards:

THE AWARD
for Best New Art Gallery 
goes to
VECTOR Gallery  -  
"The Official Art Gallery of Satan"
Truly the most spiritually refreshing, not to mention entertaining, art gallery in New York at this time.  Go buy a special soul from owner JJ Brine or sell whatever is left of your own.
ZoomInfo
artawards:

THE AWARD
for Best New Art Gallery 
goes to
VECTOR Gallery  -  
"The Official Art Gallery of Satan"
Truly the most spiritually refreshing, not to mention entertaining, art gallery in New York at this time.  Go buy a special soul from owner JJ Brine or sell whatever is left of your own.
ZoomInfo
artawards:

THE AWARD
for Best New Art Gallery 
goes to
VECTOR Gallery  -  
"The Official Art Gallery of Satan"
Truly the most spiritually refreshing, not to mention entertaining, art gallery in New York at this time.  Go buy a special soul from owner JJ Brine or sell whatever is left of your own.
ZoomInfo
artawards:

THE AWARD
for Best New Art Gallery 
goes to
VECTOR Gallery  -  
"The Official Art Gallery of Satan"
Truly the most spiritually refreshing, not to mention entertaining, art gallery in New York at this time.  Go buy a special soul from owner JJ Brine or sell whatever is left of your own.
ZoomInfo

artawards:

THE AWARD

for Best New Art Gallery 

goes to

VECTOR Gallery  -  

"The Official Art Gallery of Satan"

Truly the most spiritually refreshing, not to mention entertaining, art gallery in New York at this time.  Go buy a special soul from owner JJ Brine or sell whatever is left of your own.

(via vectorgallery)

Source: artawards

vectorgallery:


What’s the Deal With the Gallery of Satan?
by WHITNEY KIMBALL  
The art world likes to give the appearance of cool omniscience, so it seems unlikely that the indoctrinated will take a shine to the Lower East Side’s Vector, the “Official Gallery of Satan.” In an art context, devil worship (especially by a bunch of twenty-somethings) typically indicates a little more emotional immaturity than we’re willing to take seriously.
That’s too bad, because as an artwork, Vector offers plenty to think about. I live across the street, and throughout the day, can see people hanging out in the gallery– drawing in the guest book, playing ouija, drinking red wine– under fluorescent purple lighting, and always with Vector’s founder, an extremely charming blonde named JJ Brine.
Brine (who looks to be in his early-mid twenties) rearranges an installation of Satanic talisman as late as 6 AM, always in a uniform of a white T-shirt and cap. He looks a little like somebody out of Party Monster. He’s fond of challenging visitors to long, intense staring sessions, next to a basket of souls, which are contained in the clear bubbles you get in grocery store gumball machines.
The gallery attracts a ton of photographers,probably due to the fact that it’s open 24/7 and displays naked dead baby dolls against the backdrop of a big Charles Manson headshot. This also makes it a lightning rod for picketers. “Somebody wrote ‘Fuck you Satan-lover’ on the window,” JJ told me, smiling. “I like that it makes you choose a side.” You’d think people can’t be shocked anymore, but the polemics of the nineties are still very much possible.
Vector also hints at the fairly-recent makeover of the Lower East Side. It’s next door to the swank restaurant wd~50 (with a tasting menu and a chef from Jean Georges) but the space itself has much more in common with the soon-to-be renovated ABC No Rio, down the street (with its Saturday punk matinees and crusty assemblage of generations of art).
Brine’s generally reluctant to give much of an explanation, deflecting most questions about the space with “What do you think it is?”. He tells me that the space is always in flux, with areas designated for various purposes. In that vein, I’m pretty sure the hypnotism has something to do with transference of identity; after long staring sessions, he’ll often introduce himself as the person he’s just hypnotized.
“This is the weather vane,” he told me, pointing to a chain of rubber straps dangling from the ceiling. “It tells me what to do next, how the space needs to change. If something falls, then it’s supposed to be there.” Behind that sits a wall with 666 stickers on a toilet seat, a sign reading “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ,” and, on another wall, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord.”
The Manson wall, according to the website, is officially titled “Abraxas Shrine”: a term from Gnosticism, defined by Carl Jung as a combination of both the Lord and the Devil, but more infinite than either. (Jung is said to have written the Gnostic treatise “The Seven Sermons to the Dead” under altered states of consciousness, which he undertook intermittently throughout the 1910’s). Gnosticism is the ancient belief that the material world should be shunned, and the spiritual embraced in order to reach enlightenment.
Vector’s version of Gnosticism doesn’t exactly shun the material realm; there’s shit everywhere, and in a way, the weathervane feels like an expression of spiritual binging and purging, and a constant flux of object arrangements. The accumulation immediately raises the question of how a twenty-something could afford to jam all this stuff into New York City real estate, with just a handful of souls for sale; but then, Gnostics believe that enlightenment can be reached through philanthropy to the point of poverty.
So when JJ asked me to write something from an art theory standpoint, at first I didn’t think it would be helpful or even relevant to the gallery’s spiritual MO. But there’s a reason this is specifically the gallery and not church, of Satan; if you’re trying to emulate the 20th century avant-garde (polemics, ambiguity, and an interest in asking questions without answers) then you might come up with Vector.
 This is a religion based around opposing another religion; Modernism likes polemics
The guy likes to mirror the people he talks to; The artist stereotype likes to keep identity ambiguous
This guy likes to deflect questions; “Art doesn’t provide the answer, it only asks questions”
The storefront has served as a space to reflect other people’s existing ideas (“Fuck you Satan-lover”); “Art is the lie that enables us to realize the truth.”
Gnosticism combines opposites, to talk about infinity; the fourth dimension was a popular point of interest in Duchamp, Futurism, and Cubism
These are less questions of a worshipper than of an artist. There’s an image of Nico from the Velvet Underground floating around the gallery, which makes you think of Warhol and the Factory. Similar to the Factory, the space is open at all times for artists, or randos, who are presided over by an artist who’s mastered the art of ambiguity. In general, you could read the posters with the same flat power-worship which was so integral to Warhol’s persona and imagery.
But with Warhol, there’s always a possibility that you’re being led down a rabbit hole to nowhere; this has to do more with reaching infinity, which seems more in line with Duchamp. For one, like Gnosticism, or a spiritual weathervane, reminds me of Duchamp’s theory of the “infra-thin,” was defined as the separation between two things (like a readymade broom versus a normal broom), which led to conceptualizing the fourth dimension. (From Vector’s “about” page: ““Heaven and Hell are one paradise, one pit. There is no way to see the world as a whole if you divide reality from itself.”) For another, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord” reminds me a lot of Duchamp’s “I force myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own tastes.” Vector uses a similar strategy as Duchamp’s urinal: if it’s silly or vulgar, then it’s forcing you to out your own definitions of those words.
When I sat down to write a review, though, I couldn’t give it meaning in the larger scheme of art theory, in the style of Barthes, Greenberg, or Bazin. I think JJ had hoped I would. Lately, my art viewing has been happening in a vacuum of today; whether that has to do with blogging, Millennialism, or just a personal godlessness, that’s something to think about. Vector didn’t lead me on a path to Gnostic church, but I did go out and pick up a few books of my own.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


What’s the Deal With the Gallery of Satan?
by WHITNEY KIMBALL  
The art world likes to give the appearance of cool omniscience, so it seems unlikely that the indoctrinated will take a shine to the Lower East Side’s Vector, the “Official Gallery of Satan.” In an art context, devil worship (especially by a bunch of twenty-somethings) typically indicates a little more emotional immaturity than we’re willing to take seriously.
That’s too bad, because as an artwork, Vector offers plenty to think about. I live across the street, and throughout the day, can see people hanging out in the gallery– drawing in the guest book, playing ouija, drinking red wine– under fluorescent purple lighting, and always with Vector’s founder, an extremely charming blonde named JJ Brine.
Brine (who looks to be in his early-mid twenties) rearranges an installation of Satanic talisman as late as 6 AM, always in a uniform of a white T-shirt and cap. He looks a little like somebody out of Party Monster. He’s fond of challenging visitors to long, intense staring sessions, next to a basket of souls, which are contained in the clear bubbles you get in grocery store gumball machines.
The gallery attracts a ton of photographers,probably due to the fact that it’s open 24/7 and displays naked dead baby dolls against the backdrop of a big Charles Manson headshot. This also makes it a lightning rod for picketers. “Somebody wrote ‘Fuck you Satan-lover’ on the window,” JJ told me, smiling. “I like that it makes you choose a side.” You’d think people can’t be shocked anymore, but the polemics of the nineties are still very much possible.
Vector also hints at the fairly-recent makeover of the Lower East Side. It’s next door to the swank restaurant wd~50 (with a tasting menu and a chef from Jean Georges) but the space itself has much more in common with the soon-to-be renovated ABC No Rio, down the street (with its Saturday punk matinees and crusty assemblage of generations of art).
Brine’s generally reluctant to give much of an explanation, deflecting most questions about the space with “What do you think it is?”. He tells me that the space is always in flux, with areas designated for various purposes. In that vein, I’m pretty sure the hypnotism has something to do with transference of identity; after long staring sessions, he’ll often introduce himself as the person he’s just hypnotized.
“This is the weather vane,” he told me, pointing to a chain of rubber straps dangling from the ceiling. “It tells me what to do next, how the space needs to change. If something falls, then it’s supposed to be there.” Behind that sits a wall with 666 stickers on a toilet seat, a sign reading “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ,” and, on another wall, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord.”
The Manson wall, according to the website, is officially titled “Abraxas Shrine”: a term from Gnosticism, defined by Carl Jung as a combination of both the Lord and the Devil, but more infinite than either. (Jung is said to have written the Gnostic treatise “The Seven Sermons to the Dead” under altered states of consciousness, which he undertook intermittently throughout the 1910’s). Gnosticism is the ancient belief that the material world should be shunned, and the spiritual embraced in order to reach enlightenment.
Vector’s version of Gnosticism doesn’t exactly shun the material realm; there’s shit everywhere, and in a way, the weathervane feels like an expression of spiritual binging and purging, and a constant flux of object arrangements. The accumulation immediately raises the question of how a twenty-something could afford to jam all this stuff into New York City real estate, with just a handful of souls for sale; but then, Gnostics believe that enlightenment can be reached through philanthropy to the point of poverty.
So when JJ asked me to write something from an art theory standpoint, at first I didn’t think it would be helpful or even relevant to the gallery’s spiritual MO. But there’s a reason this is specifically the gallery and not church, of Satan; if you’re trying to emulate the 20th century avant-garde (polemics, ambiguity, and an interest in asking questions without answers) then you might come up with Vector.
 This is a religion based around opposing another religion; Modernism likes polemics
The guy likes to mirror the people he talks to; The artist stereotype likes to keep identity ambiguous
This guy likes to deflect questions; “Art doesn’t provide the answer, it only asks questions”
The storefront has served as a space to reflect other people’s existing ideas (“Fuck you Satan-lover”); “Art is the lie that enables us to realize the truth.”
Gnosticism combines opposites, to talk about infinity; the fourth dimension was a popular point of interest in Duchamp, Futurism, and Cubism
These are less questions of a worshipper than of an artist. There’s an image of Nico from the Velvet Underground floating around the gallery, which makes you think of Warhol and the Factory. Similar to the Factory, the space is open at all times for artists, or randos, who are presided over by an artist who’s mastered the art of ambiguity. In general, you could read the posters with the same flat power-worship which was so integral to Warhol’s persona and imagery.
But with Warhol, there’s always a possibility that you’re being led down a rabbit hole to nowhere; this has to do more with reaching infinity, which seems more in line with Duchamp. For one, like Gnosticism, or a spiritual weathervane, reminds me of Duchamp’s theory of the “infra-thin,” was defined as the separation between two things (like a readymade broom versus a normal broom), which led to conceptualizing the fourth dimension. (From Vector’s “about” page: ““Heaven and Hell are one paradise, one pit. There is no way to see the world as a whole if you divide reality from itself.”) For another, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord” reminds me a lot of Duchamp’s “I force myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own tastes.” Vector uses a similar strategy as Duchamp’s urinal: if it’s silly or vulgar, then it’s forcing you to out your own definitions of those words.
When I sat down to write a review, though, I couldn’t give it meaning in the larger scheme of art theory, in the style of Barthes, Greenberg, or Bazin. I think JJ had hoped I would. Lately, my art viewing has been happening in a vacuum of today; whether that has to do with blogging, Millennialism, or just a personal godlessness, that’s something to think about. Vector didn’t lead me on a path to Gnostic church, but I did go out and pick up a few books of my own.
ZoomInfo
vectorgallery:


What’s the Deal With the Gallery of Satan?
by WHITNEY KIMBALL  
The art world likes to give the appearance of cool omniscience, so it seems unlikely that the indoctrinated will take a shine to the Lower East Side’s Vector, the “Official Gallery of Satan.” In an art context, devil worship (especially by a bunch of twenty-somethings) typically indicates a little more emotional immaturity than we’re willing to take seriously.
That’s too bad, because as an artwork, Vector offers plenty to think about. I live across the street, and throughout the day, can see people hanging out in the gallery– drawing in the guest book, playing ouija, drinking red wine– under fluorescent purple lighting, and always with Vector’s founder, an extremely charming blonde named JJ Brine.
Brine (who looks to be in his early-mid twenties) rearranges an installation of Satanic talisman as late as 6 AM, always in a uniform of a white T-shirt and cap. He looks a little like somebody out of Party Monster. He’s fond of challenging visitors to long, intense staring sessions, next to a basket of souls, which are contained in the clear bubbles you get in grocery store gumball machines.
The gallery attracts a ton of photographers,probably due to the fact that it’s open 24/7 and displays naked dead baby dolls against the backdrop of a big Charles Manson headshot. This also makes it a lightning rod for picketers. “Somebody wrote ‘Fuck you Satan-lover’ on the window,” JJ told me, smiling. “I like that it makes you choose a side.” You’d think people can’t be shocked anymore, but the polemics of the nineties are still very much possible.
Vector also hints at the fairly-recent makeover of the Lower East Side. It’s next door to the swank restaurant wd~50 (with a tasting menu and a chef from Jean Georges) but the space itself has much more in common with the soon-to-be renovated ABC No Rio, down the street (with its Saturday punk matinees and crusty assemblage of generations of art).
Brine’s generally reluctant to give much of an explanation, deflecting most questions about the space with “What do you think it is?”. He tells me that the space is always in flux, with areas designated for various purposes. In that vein, I’m pretty sure the hypnotism has something to do with transference of identity; after long staring sessions, he’ll often introduce himself as the person he’s just hypnotized.
“This is the weather vane,” he told me, pointing to a chain of rubber straps dangling from the ceiling. “It tells me what to do next, how the space needs to change. If something falls, then it’s supposed to be there.” Behind that sits a wall with 666 stickers on a toilet seat, a sign reading “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ,” and, on another wall, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord.”
The Manson wall, according to the website, is officially titled “Abraxas Shrine”: a term from Gnosticism, defined by Carl Jung as a combination of both the Lord and the Devil, but more infinite than either. (Jung is said to have written the Gnostic treatise “The Seven Sermons to the Dead” under altered states of consciousness, which he undertook intermittently throughout the 1910’s). Gnosticism is the ancient belief that the material world should be shunned, and the spiritual embraced in order to reach enlightenment.
Vector’s version of Gnosticism doesn’t exactly shun the material realm; there’s shit everywhere, and in a way, the weathervane feels like an expression of spiritual binging and purging, and a constant flux of object arrangements. The accumulation immediately raises the question of how a twenty-something could afford to jam all this stuff into New York City real estate, with just a handful of souls for sale; but then, Gnostics believe that enlightenment can be reached through philanthropy to the point of poverty.
So when JJ asked me to write something from an art theory standpoint, at first I didn’t think it would be helpful or even relevant to the gallery’s spiritual MO. But there’s a reason this is specifically the gallery and not church, of Satan; if you’re trying to emulate the 20th century avant-garde (polemics, ambiguity, and an interest in asking questions without answers) then you might come up with Vector.
 This is a religion based around opposing another religion; Modernism likes polemics
The guy likes to mirror the people he talks to; The artist stereotype likes to keep identity ambiguous
This guy likes to deflect questions; “Art doesn’t provide the answer, it only asks questions”
The storefront has served as a space to reflect other people’s existing ideas (“Fuck you Satan-lover”); “Art is the lie that enables us to realize the truth.”
Gnosticism combines opposites, to talk about infinity; the fourth dimension was a popular point of interest in Duchamp, Futurism, and Cubism
These are less questions of a worshipper than of an artist. There’s an image of Nico from the Velvet Underground floating around the gallery, which makes you think of Warhol and the Factory. Similar to the Factory, the space is open at all times for artists, or randos, who are presided over by an artist who’s mastered the art of ambiguity. In general, you could read the posters with the same flat power-worship which was so integral to Warhol’s persona and imagery.
But with Warhol, there’s always a possibility that you’re being led down a rabbit hole to nowhere; this has to do more with reaching infinity, which seems more in line with Duchamp. For one, like Gnosticism, or a spiritual weathervane, reminds me of Duchamp’s theory of the “infra-thin,” was defined as the separation between two things (like a readymade broom versus a normal broom), which led to conceptualizing the fourth dimension. (From Vector’s “about” page: ““Heaven and Hell are one paradise, one pit. There is no way to see the world as a whole if you divide reality from itself.”) For another, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord” reminds me a lot of Duchamp’s “I force myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own tastes.” Vector uses a similar strategy as Duchamp’s urinal: if it’s silly or vulgar, then it’s forcing you to out your own definitions of those words.
When I sat down to write a review, though, I couldn’t give it meaning in the larger scheme of art theory, in the style of Barthes, Greenberg, or Bazin. I think JJ had hoped I would. Lately, my art viewing has been happening in a vacuum of today; whether that has to do with blogging, Millennialism, or just a personal godlessness, that’s something to think about. Vector didn’t lead me on a path to Gnostic church, but I did go out and pick up a few books of my own.
ZoomInfo

vectorgallery:

What’s the Deal With the Gallery of Satan?

by WHITNEY KIMBALL  

The art world likes to give the appearance of cool omniscience, so it seems unlikely that the indoctrinated will take a shine to the Lower East Side’s Vector, the “Official Gallery of Satan.” In an art context, devil worship (especially by a bunch of twenty-somethings) typically indicates a little more emotional immaturity than we’re willing to take seriously.

That’s too bad, because as an artwork, Vector offers plenty to think about. I live across the street, and throughout the day, can see people hanging out in the gallery– drawing in the guest book, playing ouija, drinking red wine– under fluorescent purple lighting, and always with Vector’s founder, an extremely charming blonde named JJ Brine.

Brine (who looks to be in his early-mid twenties) rearranges an installation of Satanic talisman as late as 6 AM, always in a uniform of a white T-shirt and cap. He looks a little like somebody out of Party Monster. He’s fond of challenging visitors to long, intense staring sessions, next to a basket of souls, which are contained in the clear bubbles you get in grocery store gumball machines.

The gallery attracts a ton of photographers,probably due to the fact that it’s open 24/7 and displays naked dead baby dolls against the backdrop of a big Charles Manson headshot. This also makes it a lightning rod for picketers. “Somebody wrote ‘Fuck you Satan-lover’ on the window,” JJ told me, smiling. “I like that it makes you choose a side.” You’d think people can’t be shocked anymore, but the polemics of the nineties are still very much possible.

Vector also hints at the fairly-recent makeover of the Lower East Side. It’s next door to the swank restaurant wd~50 (with a tasting menu and a chef from Jean Georges) but the space itself has much more in common with the soon-to-be renovated ABC No Rio, down the street (with its Saturday punk matinees and crusty assemblage of generations of art).

Brine’s generally reluctant to give much of an explanation, deflecting most questions about the space with “What do you think it is?”. He tells me that the space is always in flux, with areas designated for various purposes. In that vein, I’m pretty sure the hypnotism has something to do with transference of identity; after long staring sessions, he’ll often introduce himself as the person he’s just hypnotized.

“This is the weather vane,” he told me, pointing to a chain of rubber straps dangling from the ceiling. “It tells me what to do next, how the space needs to change. If something falls, then it’s supposed to be there.” Behind that sits a wall with 666 stickers on a toilet seat, a sign reading “Charles Manson is Jesus Christ,” and, on another wall, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord.”

The Manson wall, according to the website, is officially titled “Abraxas Shrine”: a term from Gnosticism, defined by Carl Jung as a combination of both the Lord and the Devil, but more infinite than either. (Jung is said to have written the Gnostic treatise “The Seven Sermons to the Dead” under altered states of consciousness, which he undertook intermittently throughout the 1910’s). Gnosticism is the ancient belief that the material world should be shunned, and the spiritual embraced in order to reach enlightenment.

Vector’s version of Gnosticism doesn’t exactly shun the material realm; there’s shit everywhere, and in a way, the weathervane feels like an expression of spiritual binging and purging, and a constant flux of object arrangements. The accumulation immediately raises the question of how a twenty-something could afford to jam all this stuff into New York City real estate, with just a handful of souls for sale; but then, Gnostics believe that enlightenment can be reached through philanthropy to the point of poverty.

So when JJ asked me to write something from an art theory standpoint, at first I didn’t think it would be helpful or even relevant to the gallery’s spiritual MO. But there’s a reason this is specifically the gallery and not church, of Satan; if you’re trying to emulate the 20th century avant-garde (polemics, ambiguity, and an interest in asking questions without answers) then you might come up with Vector.

  •  This is a religion based around opposing another religion; Modernism likes polemics
  • The guy likes to mirror the people he talks to; The artist stereotype likes to keep identity ambiguous
  • This guy likes to deflect questions; “Art doesn’t provide the answer, it only asks questions”
  • The storefront has served as a space to reflect other people’s existing ideas (“Fuck you Satan-lover”); “Art is the lie that enables us to realize the truth.”
  • Gnosticism combines opposites, to talk about infinity; the fourth dimension was a popular point of interest in Duchamp, Futurism, and Cubism

These are less questions of a worshipper than of an artist. There’s an image of Nico from the Velvet Underground floating around the gallery, which makes you think of Warhol and the Factory. Similar to the Factory, the space is open at all times for artists, or randos, who are presided over by an artist who’s mastered the art of ambiguity. In general, you could read the posters with the same flat power-worship which was so integral to Warhol’s persona and imagery.

But with Warhol, there’s always a possibility that you’re being led down a rabbit hole to nowhere; this has to do more with reaching infinity, which seems more in line with Duchamp. For one, like Gnosticism, or a spiritual weathervane, reminds me of Duchamp’s theory of the “infra-thin,” was defined as the separation between two things (like a readymade broom versus a normal broom), which led to conceptualizing the fourth dimension. (From Vector’s “about” page: ““Heaven and Hell are one paradise, one pit. There is no way to see the world as a whole if you divide reality from itself.”) For another, “The Lord is the Devil, and the Devil is the Lord” reminds me a lot of Duchamp’s “I force myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own tastes.” Vector uses a similar strategy as Duchamp’s urinal: if it’s silly or vulgar, then it’s forcing you to out your own definitions of those words.

When I sat down to write a review, though, I couldn’t give it meaning in the larger scheme of art theory, in the style of Barthes, Greenberg, or Bazin. I think JJ had hoped I would. Lately, my art viewing has been happening in a vacuum of today; whether that has to do with blogging, Millennialism, or just a personal godlessness, that’s something to think about. Vector didn’t lead me on a path to Gnostic church, but I did go out and pick up a few books of my own.

(via vectorgallery)

Source: vectorgallery

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